Mission Statement

NARI-BIE brings building industry professionals together to collaborate; educate; foster working relationships; and promote our member professionals to the community.

Vision Statement

NARI-BIE is our community’s trusted resource for home and building projects and services.

Code of Ethics

Each member of the National Association of the Remodeling Industry is pledged to observe high standards of honesty, integrity and responsibility in the conduct of business by:

  • Promoting only those products and services which are functionally and economically sound, and which are consistent with objective standards of health and safety;
  • Making all advertising and sales promotion factually accurate avoiding those practices which tend to mislead or deceive the customer;
  • Writing all contracts and warranties such that they comply with federal, state and local laws;
  • Promptly acknowledging and taking appropriate action on all customer complaints;
  • Refraining from any act intended to restrain trade or suppress competition;
  • Obtaining and retaining insurance as required by federal, state and local authorities;
  • Obtaining and retaining licensing and/or registration as required by federal, state and local authorities;
  • Taking appropriate action to preserve the health and safety of employees, trade contractors, and clients.

History

In early 1952, Gerald Richards, a man actively involved in a contracting business, was contacted by two material suppliers about organizing a Builders Exchange in Pottstown. The first meeting was held on March 17, 1952 with representation from 18 firms, was held at the Pottstown? Y.M.C.A. The Building Industries Exchange (BIE) of Pottstown & Vicinity, Inc. was organized in October 1952, with 33 charter members.

The organization operated on a volunteer basis until the opening of BIE’s first office space at 20 North York Street, Pottstown in 1954. With the organizations first manager and part-time secretary, Mildred Axsmith (who would go on to serve the organization for 25 years until her retirement) BIE continued to grow for over a decade. Then, in 1966, founding member Gerald Richards, began as Executive Director.

The first annual Pottstown Home Show was sponsored by BIE in 1953. That year, the inaugural show opened as a seven-day event. Today, it is 3-day event but is the only home show in the area that still focuses on promoting local business.

In 1980, interest rates rose at an alarming rate. A member approached BIE with an idea of symbolizing the death of the construction industry. In May of 1980, a funeral procession was formed including a hearse, a bus load of people supporting the event, and many individual cars that travelled all the way to Washington D.C. The procession was led, by police escort, to a plot of ground directly across from the White House. A solemn funeral service was held and the Executive Director of BIE gave the Eulogy.

In 1982, Ronald Downie, BIE President at the time, had the idea of taking on a large community service project. A local railroad station in Pottstown which had been closed for over a decade, was becoming dangerous. The station was deteriorating due to massive flooding and vandalism. The project of cleaning up the area around the station and removing interior/exterior debris took place every Saturday during October of 1982.

It became a huge community undertaking spearheaded by President Downie and BIE. A fire company pumped away the water, Waste Management provided large dumpsters to haul away debris, and Members supplied tools and equipment, and the Pottstown Police Department helped with fundraising. The work done by this group renewed interest in renovating the station in order to be used by a business and it was later purchased and converted to a new local bank in Pottstown. It is now the home of what?

Over the years, BIE has supported numerous other community service projects and organizations, contributed to local ordinance discussions, participated in youth conferences, career education days, mentored students, and served on committees focused on educating future generations about entering construction and trades fields.

In 2012, BIE affiliated with the National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI); a not-for-profit trade association with more than 50 years of industry experience. NARI-BIE strives to educate contractors on laws and ordinances that affect their industry.

Today, over 60 years since it was founded, NARI-BIE still proudly serves Montgomery, Berks and Chester Counties promoting integrity within the local construction industry and its allied services. As we continue to evolve as an organization, we work to strengthen NARI-BIE’s relationship to its members and community while upholding the founding principles that have been the foundation to our success.

Early 1952, Gerald Richards, a man actively involved in a contracting business, was contacted by two material suppliers about organizing a Builders Exchange in Pottstown. The first meeting was held on March 17, 1952 with representation from 18 firms, was held at the Pottstown? Y.M.C.A. The Building Industries Exchange (BIE) of Pottstown & Vicinity, Inc. was organized in October 1952, with 33 charter members.

The organization operated on a volunteer basis until the opening of BIE’s first office space at 20 North York Street, Pottstown in 1954. With the organizations first manager and part-time secretary, Mildred Axsmith (who would go on to serve the organization for 25 years until her retirement) BIE continued to grow for over a decade. Then, in 1966, founding member Gerald Richards, began as Executive Director.

The first annual Pottstown Home Show was sponsored by BIE in 1953. That year, the inaugural show opened as a seven-day event. Today, it is 3-day event but is the only home show in the area that still focuses on promoting local business.

In 1980, interest rates rose at an alarming rate. A member approached BIE with an idea of symbolizing the death of the construction industry. In May of 1980, a funeral procession was formed including a hearse, a bus load of people supporting the event, and many individual cars that travelled all the way to Washington D.C. The procession was led, by police escort, to a plot of ground directly across from the White House. A solemn funeral service was held and the Executive Director of BIE gave the Eulogy.

In 1982, Ronald Downie, BIE President at the time, had the idea of taking on a large community service project. A local railroad station in Pottstown which had been closed for over a decade, was becoming dangerous. The station was deteriorating due to massive flooding and vandalism. The project of cleaning up the area around the station and removing interior/exterior debris took place every Saturday during October of 1982.

It became a huge community undertaking spearheaded by President Downie and BIE. A fire company pumped away the water, Waste Management provided large dumpsters to haul away debris, and Members supplied tools and equipment, and the Pottstown Police Department helped with fundraising. The work done by this group renewed interest in renovating the station in order to be used by a business and it was later purchased and converted to a new local bank in Pottstown. It is now the home of what?

Over the years, BIE has supported numerous other community service projects and organizations, contributed to local ordinance discussions, participated in youth conferences, career education days, mentored students, and served on committees focused on educating future generations about entering construction and trades fields.

In 2012, BIE affiliated with the National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI); a not-for-profit trade association with more than 50 years of industry experience. NARI-BIE strives to educate contractors on laws and ordinances that affect their industry.

Today, over 60 years since it was founded, NARI-BIE still proudly serves Montgomery, Berks and Chester Counties promoting integrity within the local construction industry and its allied services. As we continue to evolve as an organization, we work to strengthen NARI-BIE’s relationship to its members and community while upholding the founding principles that have been the foundation to our success.